Mystery Critter #87

 

It’s ba-ack! That’s right folks, your old friend the Mystery Critter is back and ready to stump you. :-)

So put on your thinking caps and let’s see if you can crack the case. And remember — no cheating! ;-)

CRITTER CLUES:

  • I am considered to be quite beautiful
  • Sadly, I am on the Endangered Species List
  • I feed solely on one plant
  • I am found in approximately six (6) US states, including Indiana
  • You may not see me where you live, but you can see plenty of my cousins

What am I?

Make your guess, and then go here for the answer and more interesting facts. Did you get it right?! If not, no worries — you’ll have another chance soon!

Favor:  Don’t share the answers in the comments below or out there in the social mediasphere — we want to keep the game fun for all.

Now, you probably won’t get a chance to see this Mystery Critter this weekend, but rest assured, there is plenty to be seen. Just step outside with open eyes and a quest for adventure. Grab the kids, and see what you can find.

And let folks know about it! Join the Wildobs community, and report your wildlife observations.

Fun Fact: Today (May 19th) is National Kids to Parks Day! I hope you will all celebrate with the ones you love.

Until next time, my nature detectives! Don’t forget to #playoutdoors.

See ya outside! – The Grass Stain Guru

 

photo by: Andy Hay

Mystery Critter #86

Spring has sprung a bit early here in the US, which makes it even more of a treat to head outdoors this weekend. Mother Nature has started her annual show of buds and blooms and shades of greens that feed our souls.

So my favorite nature detectives, let’s get to it. Let’s play Mystery Critter!

Put on those thinking caps, and remember, no peeking! ;-)

TGSG Note: Please don’t post your brilliant guess in the comments or on Twitter. We don’t want to ruin the surprise for the other detectives. Make sure to check the link to see if you got it right!

CRITTER CLUES:

  • I am quite common throughout North America
  • Unlike many species, both males and females pitch-in with “child care”
  • I munch on everything from rabbits to lizards (yum!)
  • Open fields are my habitat
  • You’ve probably seen me when you are out for a drive

So, what am I?! 

Make your guess then go here for the answer and more interesting facts.

Did you get it right? 

If not, no worries. You will have another chance soon!

Remember, when looking for wildlife, keep your eyes and ears open! Look high and low, and most importantly, enjoy yourself.

Exploring the natural world with children is a special treat. Get lost in the wonder and awe that only Mother Nature can provide.

What critters can you spot in your neck of the woods? Be sure to tell us!

And don’t forget,  join the Wildobs community and share your wild adventures with the world.

See ya outside! ~ The Grass Stain Guru

photo by: geminder

Mystery Critter #85

CBC4kids

“Children are born naturalists. They explore the world with all of their senses, experiment in the environment, and communicate their discoveries to those around them.”

The Audubon Nature Preschool

What time is it? Well, it’s play time, of course — time to play Mystery Critter! Time to put your wildlife knowledge and sleuth skills to the test, and encourage everyone to get outside and explore nature.

So, let’s get to it! Put on those thinking caps and remember, no cheating. ;-)

TGSG Note: Oh — and please don’t post your brilliant guess in the comments or on Twitter. We don’t want to ruin the surprise for the other detectives. Make sure to check the link to see if you got it right!

CRITTER CLUES:

  • I am part of a very large family;
  • You might call me a scavenger but I prefer to think of it as recycling;
  • I am nocturnal; and
  • In some parts of the world I am eaten, while in others I am used as a type of prize fighter.

What am I? Make your guess, and then go here for the answer and  more interesting facts.

Did you get it right?! If not, no worries — you’ll have another chance soon!

If you have never seen this Mystery Critter before, but I am sure you have seen a critter from its family. Wildlife comes in all shapes and sizes, so don’t forget to look from dirt level to skyline in your quest to become a true nature detective.

And don’t forget to let everyone know what you see! Join the Wildobs community and report your wildlife observations. It’s a great way to keep track of your wild adventures and share info with others.

See ya outside! ~ The Grass Stain Guru

Creative Commons License photo credit: USFWS Mountain Prairie

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...